Unique Skill ID: KS12052708ZWMVP7XZ8B

Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act (ACPA)

The Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act (ACPA), 15 U.S.C. § 1125(d),(passed as part of Pub.L. 106–113 ) is a U.S. law enacted in 1999 that established a cause of action for registering, trafficking in, or using a domain name confusingly similar to, or dilutive of, a trademark or personal name. The law was designed to thwart "cybersquatters" who register Internet domain names containing trademarks with no intention of creating a legitimate web site, but instead plan to sell the domain name to the trademark owner or a third party. Critics of the ACPA complain about the non-global scope of the Act and its potential to restrict free speech, while others dispute these complaints. Before the ACPA was enacted, trademark owners relied heavily on the Federal Trademark Dilution Act (FTDA) to sue domain name registrants. The FTDA was enacted in 1995 in part with the intent to curb domain name abuses. The legislative history of the FTDA specifically mentions that trademark dilution in domain names was a matter of Congressional concern motivating the Act. Senator Leahy stated that "it is my hope that this anti-dilution statute can help stem the use of deceptive Internet addresses taken by those who are choosing marks that are associated with the products and reputations of others".

Read Full Description
This Skill is part of Lightcast Open Skills, a library of over 32,000 skills used by schools, communities, and businesses that has become the standard language.
Search for other skills

Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act (ACPA) Job Postings Data

Top Companies Posting

Job Postings Analytics Loading Spinner

Top Job Titles

Job Postings Analytics Loading Spinner

Job Postings Trend

Job Postings Analytics Loading Spinner

Live Job Postings

Job Postings Analytics Loading Spinner

Looking for more data on job postings?